Habitat Creation | Wildflower habitats


Introduction
Recommended species and mixes
Methods for Wildflower sowing and propagation
Things to consider


Introduction

Did you know that 97% of Britain's wildflower meadows have been lost since World War II? The natural habitats of our birds, insects and wildlife are disappearing at a dramatic rate. You can start introducing wildflowers in your garden in an existing border, or you can create a wildflower area in a shaded corner, around the base of a tree or around the edge of a pond to complement flower beds.

Landscaping with wild seeds can be of benefit to green spaces, but equally it can be a threat to the countryside if seeds are sown without taking care to consider the effect this has on existing vegetation.

The landscape of the countryside varies, and can be classified on the basis of the naturalness of its vegetation. Wild and highly natural areas, often designated as National Nature reserves (NNR's) and Sites of Special scientific interest (SSSI's), are often the most beautiful landscapes, but where man has removed the natural vegetation (urban housing estates) the landscape is often of poor quality.

Great care should be taken if planting/sowing in sites adjacent or near to Nature reserve sites.

We will concentrate on Urban areas and gardens where anyone can sow wildflowers individually or as part of a community group.Check that the species being sown is common and widespread, attractive and non-weedy, and suited to the soil type, climate and habitat where being grown.

In public areas, non native species, foreign strains of native species or crop varieties should not be sown as this may cause a ecological disaster Wild species grown in urban areas and gardens pose no threat to the countryside if they are present there already! You can buy either wildflower plugs, habitat plug collections, individual bulbs or seed mixtures.

Wildflowers are best sown in the spring between March and April, once the risk of frost has passed, and before any dry spells arrive.

next page >> recommended species and mixtures