Wildlife | Birds in Berkshire

Species List of Birds found in Berkshire

Common Name

Black-headed Gull
Blackbird
Blackcap
Blue Tit
Bullfinch
Hooded Crow
Chaffinch
Coal Tit
Dunnock
Goldcrest
Goldfinch
Marsh Tit
Mistle Thrush
Nuthatch
Pied Wagtail
Reed Bunting
Robin
Rock Dove
Rook

Scientific Name

Larus ridibundus
Turdus merula
Sylvia atricapilla
Parus caeruleus
Pyrrhula
Corvus corone
Fringilla coelebs
Parus ater
Prunella modularis
Regulus regulus
carduelis
Parus palustris
Turdus viscivorus
Sitta europaea
Motacilla alba
Emberiza schoeniclus
Erithacus rubeculaColumba liviaCorvus

Common Name

Song Thrush
Sparrowhawk
Starling
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Green Woodpecker
Great Tit
Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Jackdaw
Jay
Long-tailed Tit
Magpie
Tawny Owl
Tree Sparrow
Treecreeper
Woodpigeon
Whitethroat
Wren
Willow Warbler
Sedge warbler
Yellowhammer

 

Scientific Name

frugilegusTurdus philomelosAccipiter nisus
Sturnus vulgaris

Dendrocopos major
Dendrocopos sp.
Parus major
Carduelis chloris
Passer domesticus
Corvus monedula
Garrulus glandarius
Aegithalos caudatus
Pica pica
Strix aluco
Passer montanus
Certhia familiaris
Columba palumbus
Troglodytes troglodytes
Emberiza citrinella


<< back to previous page

Top ten of the most Common Feeding Birds found in Berkshire Gardens

Most noticeable are the sharp decline of the house sparrow, song thrush and starling, and the rise of the collared dove.

Position 1970's 1990's
1 Blackbird Blue tit
2 Blue tit Blackbird
3 Robin Robin
4 House sparrow Great tit
5 Starling Greenfinch
6 Dunnock Chaffinch
7 Great tit Dunnock
8 Chaffinch House sparrow
9 Greenfinch Starling
10 Song thrush Collared dove


<< back to previous page

Table showing Britain's birds - The Winners and Losers

Winners

  • Red kite - Fork tailed bird of prey persecuted by keepers and egg collectors. Reduced to one female in Wales before Britain's most successful reintroduction programme, 2,500 pairs predicted by 2010
  • Blackcap - Sweet singing wood and scrub warbler. Big population expansion into Northern England and Ireland. 620,000 pairs
  • Hobby - Britain's only migrant bird of prey. Once a rare visitor to Southern England; now has spread North and increased to more than 600 pairs.
  • Magpie - Continues to thrive despite persecution, population has increased to more than 910,000 pairs.
  • Siskin  - Found in coniferous plantations originally only found in Scottish forests, now 360,000 pairs
  • Nuthatch - Once common only in Southern England, now expanded to Scotland and colonised all of Wales.

Losers

  • Red Backed shrike - Victim of farming intensification and egg collectors. Disappeared from East Anglian heathland about 1990
  • Lapwing - Fast running out of food and habitat because of changing agricultural practices. Population in freefall, estimated 126,000 pairs.
  • Corn bunting - forced out by farming intensification. Possibly extinct in Ireland and having a bad time in Britain. Fewer than 20,000 pairs
  • Turtle dove - declined by 85 % from English farmland in 25 years, down to 50,000 pairs
  • Skylark - Victim of farming intensification & thus loss of favourable habitat, 2m pairs
  • Spotted flycatcher - Another victim of farming intensification. Less than 100,000 pairs

    << back to previous page